Donating Blood

I received a number of comments on my post relating to blood type and health. Here’s one from my fraternity brother:   “I’m O-neg, I’m a carnivore, and I’ve given over 100 blood donations (over a dozen gallons), including to babies. I think it’s one of the reasons God keeps me around!”   Here’s another from one of my Boy Scout pals:  “I have given 26 gallons whole and done 250 platelet donations.”

Years ago – I began donating blood.  Mainly because I heard that there were health benefits (especially for men) in doing so.  And I’m on the bone marrow registry.  But maybe I’ve been stingy – judging by the generosity of my friends.   I probably went to Lifesource (the local donation venue) a dozen times.  Though I haven’t been for a few years.   

Only 37% of the American population is eligible to donate blood.  Yet according to the American Red Cross only 3% of those eligible donate.  Thus – there is nearly always a shortage for the 4.5 million Americans who need a blood transfusion each year.  The four blood types were first identified in 1901 by Dr. Karl Landsteiner (won the Nobel Prize for Medicine in 1930).  Of the four – O negative is the “universal donor” that can be given to all blood types. 

Every person has about 10 pints of blood in his/her body.  How about tithing?  Give a pint to your local donation center.  It’s not about the hour you’ll spend.  It’s about the life you may save. . . . .       

Blood Type and Health

Do you know your blood type?  You should.  Thousands of years of evolution have split human blood into four basic “types”: A, B, O and AB. Each has a postive (+) and negative (-) (called “RH”) component as well.   Roughly 43% of us are type O; 40% type A; 12% type B; and 5% type AB with interesting geographic, racial and ethnic differences in blood type and RH distribution. 

While there is speculation that blood type predicts broad personality traits (especially in Japanese studies), there is strong indication that different blood types have different vulnerabilities — and do better with certain diets.  A recent University of Pennsylvania study (April 2019) confirms that certain blood types are more prone to heart disease (see https://www.pennmedicine.org/updates/blogs/health-and-wellness/2019/april/blood-types ).   Where one blood type does well on a meat diet, others might suffer.   

Type O is the oldest blood type in the world with the most robust digestive system.  Type O needs animal protein for good health.  Has trouble with wheat and gluten.   Thrives on vigorous workouts.  Less prone to heart disease.  O negative is a universal donor.

Type A has a more fragile digestive system which has trouble tolerating 4 legged protein.  This blood type might do well as a vegetarian.  Can be lactose intolerant and anemic.  For this reason, iron and Vitamin B-12 supplements may be helpful. 

Type B has difficulty with wheat and gluten though dairy is usually just fine.  Chicken can cause health issues due to an agglutinating lectin which may adversely affect the circulatory system. 

Type AB is the new kid on the block having been around for perhaps 1,000 years.  Should avoid red meat especially smoked and cured meats as AB shares the low stomach acid of Type A and diminished stomach acid leaves one more prone to stomach cancer. 

An interesting study of the respective vulnerabilities by blood type is found at https://www.gaia.com/article/7-relations-between-different-blood-types-health  There are many articles on this topic.  Just Google blood type and health

Gluten

In my post of October 4, 2012, I talked about how the four blood types vary in terms of vulnerability to certain foods. O (the oldest blood type) is robust and needs animal protein; A is more fragile and has some issues with animal protein (especially the 4-legged variety); for B, chicken is a red flag which can cause health complications; and AB has diminished stomach acid and thus should avoid certain foods.

One of the interesting adjuncts to studies on blood type is the effects of wheat and gluten.  For type A, gluten is usually just fine but for types O and B, gluten can cause inflammation of joints and exacerbate arthritis.  This gluten intolerance is not a result of celiac disease – the autoimmune disorder of the small intestine which causes severe inflammation resulting from gluten (wheat).  It is just that gluten-intolerance can result in aggravation of arthritis and a painful increase in joint and muscle issues.

Donna is type O.  And she has had issues with joint and muscle issues (as well as arthritis).  So she has been steering away from gluten for a while.  However one weekend – after a gluten overload of pasta, breads and other grains, she could barely walk.  The pain neared a ten.  Off gluten again, the pain receded and things were good.  Today, Donna – a type O – is just fine with all manner of proteins, potatoes, vegetables and such but she is on the wagon when it comes to gluten.  And she is feeling better. 

Any type O or B who is having issues with joint inflammation and pain might consider going cold turkey on gluten.  Just to try.  There’s no cost, no risk and it just might help.   But don’t take my word for it.  Google the operative words gluten inflammation or gluten arthritis and reach your own conclusions.     

Blood Type and Health

Do you know your blood type?  You should.  Thousands of years of evolution have split human blood into four basic “types”: A, B, O and AB. Each has a postive (+) and negative (-) (called “RH”) component as well.   Roughly 43 % of us are type O; 40% type A; 12% type B; and 5% type AB with interesting geographic, racial and ethnic differences in blood type and RH distribution. 

While there is speculation that blood type predicts broad personality traits (especially in Japanese studies), there is strong indication that different blood types have different vulnerabilities — and do better with certain diets.  A recent Harvard study (reported in August) confirms that certain blood types are more prone to heart disease (see http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-19257876).   Where one blood type does well on a meat diet, others might suffer.   

Type O is the oldest blood type in the world with the most robust digestive system.  Needs animal protein for good health.  Has trouble with wheat and gluten.   Thrives on vigorous workouts.  Less prone to heart disease.  O negative is a universal donor.

Type A has a more fragile digestive system which has trouble tolerating animal protein.  This blood type might do well as a vegetarian.  Can be lactose intolerant and anemic.  For this reason, iron and Vitamin B-12 supplements may be helpful. 

Type B has difficulty with wheat and gluten though dairy is usually just fine.  Chicken is an apparent “red flag” which can turn into a serious health issue due to an agglutinating lectin which can adversely affect the circulatory system. 

Type AB is the new kid on the block having been around for perhaps 1,000 years.  Should avoid red meat especially smoked and cured meats as AB shares the low stomach acid of Type A and diminished stomach acid leaves one more prone to stomach cancer. 

An interesting website of author Dr. Peter D’Adamo with extensive discussion on the subject can be found at  www.dadamo.com