Legal Pads

I’m a lawyer. I do a lot of scribbling on paper. Notes. Phone numbers. Client comments. Problems. Flow charts. Ideas. Cartoons.  And so on. When I’m done and no longer need my scribbles, I toss out the sheet and have a fresh, blank page staring at me.  What’s interesting is that I haven’t used a yellow or white lined legal pad in years (unless I happen to be in a meeting).

I have a printer outside my office.  It sometimes spits out more than is needed.  Rather than pitch the nearly-blank pages, I save them.  Turn them over and clip ’em together.  And use them as a “legal pad.”  I figure that over the years, I’ve saved a tree or two.   Just from using paper that’s blank on one side with some words on the other.  

I feel pretty strongly about conservation.  And recycling.  My trademark JUST TURN IT OFF® says it all (see post of July 23, 2011).  Why can’t we all conserve water, energy and clean air (see May 21, 2012); stretch products like shampoo (see April 11, 2013); reuse “zarfs” (see October 29, 2015); reuse bags (see August 6, 2012).  Each one of us has potential to make a big difference in the world.  Just think if everyone . . . . . . 

It’s the little details that are vital.  Little things make big things happen.”   — John Wooden 

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Shampoo

In my post of July 23, 2011 (“Just Turn it Off“), I spoke of things we can all do (that cost nothing) — to save water, energy and clean air and to cut down on pollution.  Little things like when taking a shower, turn on the water, get wet – then turn off the water and soap down.  Then rinse.   You’ll actually get cleaner and you’ll save gallons of water that otherwise simply pour down the drain.   Just think if everyone did this. . . .

Speaking of showers, here’s another thought that saves money and helps the environment.  Shampoo.   A few years ago, I was in the shower and there was no shampoo.  I had an empty container from which I could squeeze nada.  Grrrrrrrrr . . . . . So I unscrewed the top, held the container under the water swirled the liquid in the bottle and – voila – shampoo.  It was a little watery but it worked every bit as good as the thick gloppy stuff.  It actually lasted for a few more days.  Today, when the shampoo bottle is making that distinctive “Pfffftttttt” sound when I squeeze it, I unscrew the top, let water drain in, screw the top back on, give it a shake and I have shampoo for another week or two.  Try it.  You’ll like it.  So will your wallet.  And the sewer system . . . .