Don’t Get “Tired”

[A timely winter repeat from December 15, 2013]

My friend Al reminded me that in cold weather, it’s a good idea to check car tires since the cold will contract air pressure and tires can flatten out.  So, wisely I did.  And sure enough – my front two tires were low. Really low.  It was night.  Cold.  So I drove to a gas station where they have one of those air pumps where you have to pop for 75 cents. I unscrewed the valve caps, had my air gauge at the ready and dropped 3 quarters. The machine kicked in and I applied the hose to the tire valve. Nothing happened.  The hose and valve were frozen.

Now this is not an issue that I’ve dealt with before so I went into the gas station where a lone clerk sat behind a thick glass partition. I explained the problem. “Valve’s frozen,” he said.  Hoookayyy. . .  “Stick the hose up your exhaust while the motor’s running and . . . . [he grabbed a lighter from the shelf and passed it under the window] warm your tire valves.”  “Bring back the lighter,”  he said. 

I went out and slid the hose a couple feet up the exhaust.  And let it sit for a few minutes.  And warm.  I fired the lighter and warmed the tire valves.  After a couple minutes, I took a breath, dropped in another 75 cents and applied the hose to the tire valve.  “PFFFFTT.”  It worked like a charm.  Whew!  The tire inflated and I brought the lighter back.  I thanked the clerk (offered him a tip – he declined).  “I used to drive a semi” he said.  “Used to happen all the time.  It’s one of those little tricks you learn.” 

Now you all know the trick.  🙂   

A Winter Tip

Happy New Year!!  (A valuable winter tip from post of December 15, 2013)

My friend Al reminded me that in cold weather, it’s a good idea to check car tires since the cold will contract air pressure and tires can flatten out. I did and sure enough – my front two tires were low. Really low. It was night. Cold. So I went to a gas station where they have one of those air pumps where you have to pop for 75 cents. I unscrewed the valve caps, had my air gauge at the ready and dropped 3 quarters. The machine kicked in and I applied the hose to the tire valve. Nothing happened. Everything was frozen.

Now this is not an issue that I’ve dealt with before so I shivered my way into the gas station where a lone clerk sat behind a thick glass partition.  I explained the problem. “Valve’s frozen,” he said. Hoookayyy. . . “Stick the hose up your exhaust while the motor’s running and . . . . [he grabbed a lighter from the shelf and passed it under the window] warm your tire valves if they’re frozen.” “Bring back the lighter,” he said.

I went out and slid the hose a couple feet up the exhaust. And let it sit for a few minutes. And warm. I lit the lighter and warmed the tire valves. After a couple minutes, I took a breath, dropped in another 75 cents and applied the hose to the tire valve. “PFFFFTT.” It worked like a charm. Whew! The tire inflated and I brought the lighter back. I thanked the clerk (offered him a tip – he declined). “I used to drive a semi” he said. “Used to happen all the time. It’s one of those little tricks you learn.”

Now you all know the trick. 🙂

Don’t Get “Tired”

My friend Al reminded me that in cold weather, it’s a good idea to check car tires since the cold will contract air pressure and tires can flatten out. I did and sure enough – my front two tires were low. Really low.  It was night.  Cold.  So I went to a gas station where they have one of those air pumps where you have to pop for 75 cents. I unscrewed the valve caps, had my air gauge at the ready and dropped 3 quarters. The machine kicked in and I applied the hose to the tire valve. Nothing happened.  Everything was frozen.

Now this is not an issue that I’ve dealt with before so I went into the gas station where a lone clerk sat behind a thick glass partition. I explained the problem. “Valve’s frozen,” he said.  Hoookayyy. . .  “Stick the hose up your exhaust while the motor’s running and . . . . [he grabbed a lighter from the shelf and passed it under the window] warm your tire valves if they’re frozen.”  “Bring back the lighter,”  he said. 

I went out and slid the hose a couple feet up the exhaust.  And let it sit for a few minutes.  And warm.  I lit the lighter and warmed the tire valves.  After a couple minutes, I took a breath, dropped in another 75 cents and applied the hose to the tire valve.  “PFFFFTT.”  It worked like a charm.  Whew!  The tire inflated and I brought the lighter back.  I thanked the clerk (offered him a tip – he declined).  “I used to drive a semi” he said.  “Used to happen all the time.  It’s one of those little tricks you learn.” 

Now you all know the trick.  🙂