Crossing paths with Sean Connery

On May 21, 2017, I talked about my experience of being on the Board of The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation – and spending my first board meeting (Taliesin West in Scottsdale) staying in the Sun Cottage – Mr. Wright’s home – and sleeping in his bed. Quite an experience. . . .

At one of the winter board meetings, I happened to be in the Taliesen (West) store perusing stuff. Some guy was next to me also perusing. He started to speak to the clerk and I thought I know that voice. I looked over and it was 007. Sean Connery. Oh my socks and shoes! I slipped out of the store and went into the architectural school – and casually mentioned that 007 was in the store. It seems that the speed of light was exceeded as the students whisked out of the school – to see the legendary actor. It’s what happened next that sticks in my mind.

Mister Connery came out and began walking to the parking lot with a chap (presumably a protector). Students approached him and asked for photographs and autographs. And Mister Connery could not have been nicer — staying the course until the gaggle of fans had been satisfied. And dispersed. It’s nice to see celebrities who maintain respect for those who admire them. The stories are legion about those who . . . . shall we say don’t . . . .

Sleeping in Frank’s Bed

My first Board meeting of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation was held at Taliesin West in Scottsdale, AZ.  Before leaving home, I asked where I should make reservations to stay.  I was told “don’t worry about it.   Just come to Taliesin.”  Soooooo . . . . on a Thursday afternoon – after the flight from Chicago – Donna and I showed up with our luggage at Taliesin West.  

After checking in, our host escorted us toward one edge of the compound.  There was a low-lying building that looked quite nice.  Our host keyed open the door and brought us in.  “Welcome to the Sun Cottage.”  It was explained that this was Mr. Wright’s home when he stayed at Taliesin.  Our escort walked us around the premises, handed us a key – and left.  

We wandered around the place.  Picking up knick knacks that were probably worth a small fortune.  I checked out the closet.  Mr. Wright (everyone calls him “Mister Wright“) still had clothes hanging on the rack.  From 1959 –  when he died.  I pulled a book – FLW’s autobiography – off the shelf and opened it.  It was penned and inscribed “To my darling Olgivanna from your husband Frank Lloyd Wright.”   I thought to myself – this isn’t Kansas, Toto. . . . .  That is until we got into bed.  Mr. Wright, who was all of 5′ 8″ tall, had a bed made to his size.  My tootsies hung over the end of the bed.  The next morning, I stepped into a shower which was the size of a tiny phone booth.  My shoulders touched the sides.  And the shower nozzle was positioned at the 5’8″ mark.  You coulda sold seats for the contortions I used to soap down my head. . . .